Enabling the Future

Sharing ideas and results from new technology assessments and program pilots reduces risk and cost for members.


As business models shift and new opportunities arise, programs leverage shared information from CEE to take advantage of innovation, particularly to support the move from individual products and components to data flows, whole systems, and new program strategies.

Members with active research programs assess new technologies and program approaches through the Emerging Technologies Collaborative for consideration by all members. Over four years, CEE has anticipated the introduction of connected devices in developing a specification framework for priority products. ENERGY STAR® continues to be the market platform for efficiency programs. CEE consults with relevant federal agencies in an ongoing process as we collaboratively navigate market changes.

Emerging Technologies Collaborative
Source: Nathanial M. Shelter for Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Source: Nathanial M. Shelter for Oak Ridge National Laboratory


“We’re in the process of developing our ET program. The Handbook brings us up to speed with our peers. The common language, practices, and principles it highlights help us better understand what questions we need to ask ourselves. Plus, we’re incorporating elements that enable us to collaborate effectively.” Dale Thompson, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power
In 2015, the Emerging Technologies Collaborative (ETC) worked to improve effectiveness of emerging technology (ET) programs and brought together foundational ET research to accelerate consideration of new opportunities for program promotion and market adoption.

Key accomplishments include publishing an internal Program Handbook, updating the catalog of over 500 assessments, and identifying heat pump water heaters and  variable capacity heat pumps for the Consortium to consider. Looking ahead, ETC will continue to build out an approach to prioritizing new opportunities for efficiency program consideration and advance consideration of selected priorities.

Connected Devices

CEE members encourage the commercialization of connected products that support member objectives such as efficiency, expanded load management for capacity optimization and offset of supply-side investments, and increased grid value of intermittent energy resources. CEE informs product manufacturers of functionality that is likely to attract promotion by voluntary DSM program administrators based on the collective understanding of potential customer and utility benefits. CEE has remained consistent about the importance of establishing multiple communication pathways in order to scale the customer and grid benefits of connected products. In 2015, CEE began to flesh out specification requirements for unitary HVAC systems, standardized support data needs for customer engagement platforms offered by CEE members, and informed the CEE approach through review of existing standards, market research, and program requirements.

Goals of Connected

The Connected Committee specification framework requires definition of the following device characteristics within relevant CEE initiatives:

  • Communication architecture and protocols
  • Customer data security
  • Product physical location
  • Discoverability and availability
  • Automatic rejoin and local data storage
  • Configurability for local peak period avoidance
  • Demand response functionality
  • Response time necessary for participation in wholesale energy and capacity markets
  • Data reporting capabilities
  • Newly enabled energy efficiency, including diagnostics and behavior
  • Consumer engagement capabilities
  • Testing and verification requirements

Through the Connected Committee, the following members take advantage of CEE’s established process and relationship with industry to specify consensus requirements for products that serve both efficiency and load management objectives:

AEP
Location: AR, OH, TX
Fuel: Electric

AUSTIN ENERGY
Location: TX
Fuel: Combo

AVISTA UTILITIES
Location: WA
Fuel: Combo

BALTIMORE GAS & ELECTRIC CO
Location: MD
Fuel: Combo

BC HYDRO
Location: BC
Fuel: Electric

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION
Location: WA, OR, ID, MT
Fuel: Electric

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE FOR ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT
Location: CA
Fuel: None

COMMONWEALTH EDISON COMPANY
Location: IL
Fuel: Electric

CONSOLIDATED EDISON COMPANY
Location: NY
Fuel: Combo

DTE ENERGY
Location: MI
Fuel: Combo

DUKE ENERGY
Location: NC, SC, FL, IN, KY, OH
Fuel: Combo

EFFICIENCY VERMONT
Location: VT
Fuel: Efficiency

EPRI
Fuel: None

EVERSOURCE
Location: MA, RI, NH, CT
Fuel: Combo

FRAUNHOFER CSE
Fuel: None

HYDRO-QUÉBEC
Location: QC
Fuel: Combo

MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RESOURCES
Location: MA
Fuel: Efficiency

NATIONAL GRID
Location: NY, MA, RI
Fuel: Combo

NATURAL RESOURCES CANADA
Location: Canada
Fuel: Efficiency

NORTHEAST ENERGY EFFICIENCY PARTNERSHIPS
Fuel: None

NORTHWEST ENERGY EFFICIENCY ALLIANCE
Location: OR, WA, ID, MT
Fuel: None

NV ENERGY
Location: NV
Fuel: Combo

ONCOR
Location: TX
Fuel: Electric

PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY
Location: CA
Fuel: Combo

PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY
Fuel: None

PORTLAND GENERAL ELECTRIC
Location: OR
Fuel: Electric

PSEG LONG ISLAND
Location: NY
Fuel: Combo

QUESTAR GAS COMPANY
Location: UT
Fuel: Gas

SACRAMENTO MUNICIPAL UTILITY DISTRICT
Location: CA
Fuel: Electric

SAN DIEGO GAS & ELECTRIC
Location: CA
Fuel: Combo

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA GAS COMPANY
Location: CA
Fuel: Gas

SNOHOMISH COUNTY PUD
Location: WA
Fuel: Electric

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON
Location: CA
Fuel: Electric

SOUTHERN COMPANY
Location: GA, AL, MS
Fuel: Electric

TAMPA ELECTRIC
Location: FL
Fuel: Electric

TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY
Location: TN
Fuel: Electric

US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
Location: USA
Fuel: None

XCEL ENERGY
Location: CO, MN
Fuel: Combo

ENERGY STAR®

The Consortium’s twenty-year collaboration with ENERGY STAR provides a twofold benefit: a consumer-friendly marketing platform for members to leverage in promoting energy efficiency and a consensus definition of the minimum requirements for energy efficiency. Members, who helped build ENERGY STAR into the powerhouse brand it is today, rely on the continued integrity of the brand tenets.

In 2015, CEE actively engaged EPA on a number of strategic decisions facing the brand. The Consortium conveyed consensus comments on communicating thermostats, lamps, and commercial boilers, fryers, toasters, and ovens.

As CEE has done for the past eight years, the Consortium facilitated an annual meeting between the CEE Board Committee on ENERGY STAR and senior EPA and DOE management. CEE and these federal agencies share status, market trends, and evolutionary changes in efficiency programs and ENERGY STAR. Together, we identify opportunities for alignment and partnership that increase brand equity and enhance the role of ENERGY STAR as a platform for use in members’ programs.

Leveraging ENERGY STAR for Clean Power Plan (CPP) compliance is one such partnership opportunity. EPA believes that ENERGY STAR provides an effective platform in state efforts to comply with the CPP requirements, and CEE members can attest to how effective ENERGY STAR has been in promoting efficiency.